• Events
SEE ALL
Dec
16
19
Performance
Fractales - Compagnie Libertivore Alexander Kasser Theater 1 Normal Avenue Montclair , US 07043
Dec
16
19
Performance
Fractales - Compagnie Libertivore Alexander Kasser Theater 1 Normal Avenue Montclair , US 07043
Jan
14
23
Performance
Pascal Rambert Residency and Performances Performance Spaces for the 21st C. (PS21) 2980 Route 66 PO Box 321 Chatham, US 12037

How Can Conservation Banks Be a Solution for Climate Change?

Land Use Change Can Exacerbate Climate Change 

As environmental degradation and climate change continue to advance, it is necessary to search for new policy instruments to address those challenges and advance sustainability efforts. One of the world’s biggest challenges is the change in land. When land is built upon, animals flee or die and plant life is destroyed; land use change creates a chain reaction in which biodiversity is lost. This loss in the variety of life can lead to a breakdown in the functioning of the ecosystem, which in turn exacerbates climate change and environmental issues. The sustainability challenge lies in creating innovative solutions and ensuring biodiversity protection that also deal with the demands for redeveloping land.  

A Policy Solution: Conservation Banking 

Since the 1980s, policy instruments have relied on markets and private actors to advance sustainability and create market-based solutions. The most illustrative example of new policy solutions is conservation banking. Conservation banks are permanently protected habitats, managed for species that are endangered or threatened due to land development. They function to offset damage to habitats in one location through conservation of land at another location. Conservation banking was first introduced in California in the 1990s. Now California has over 32% of total conservation banking acreage in the US, and variants of conservation banking are in other US states and countries, including France. While these policies share common traits, the overall design and implementation of conservation banking varies in each setting.  

Ethnographic Fieldwork to Help Design Future Policies 

Dr. Ritwick Ghosh, a post-doctoral researcher at Arizona State University, and Dr. Stéphanie Barral, a researcher for France’s National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment (INRAE), are attempting to synthesize and explain the variance of conservation banking in different regulatory, economic, and political environments through their comparative research approach project “Banking on Nature: Understanding the circulation of conservation banking instruments.” Through literature analysis and qualitative case-studies of conservation banking projects in Oklahoma, Texas, and France, they hope to produce detailed ethnographic fieldwork that could help design future policies govern sustainability transitions.  

Conversations With Dr. Ghosh 

In the two video interviews below, Dr. Ghosh, discusses how the Thomas Jefferson Fund’s goal of fostering international cooperation and collaboration was an integral part of his project experience. Dr. Gosh detailed how he met his French research partner, Dr. Stéphanie Barral, and the professional relationships created with other researchers and PhD students.  

 

 


Related

Thomas Jefferson Fund | FACE Foundation 

The Thomas Jefferson Fund provides a unique framework to foster innovative projects and enrich French-American research collaborations. 

LinkedIn 

Learn more about funded projects and research in all disciplines by following the Thomas Jefferson Fund on LinkedIn.

MORE IN HIGHER EDUCATION